Sunday, January 29, 2012

2534 - AMICOR 14


virus + bacteria: evolution

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 47 segundos atrás
[image: Evolution of a trait. An image of the protein, LamB, on the surface of the bacterial cell. Scientists examined what happened with the virus could no longer infect the bacteria through this protein.]*An image of a protein, LamB, found on the surface of the bacterial cell. Scientists examined what happened when a virus could no longer infect the bacteria through this protein. CREDIT: Justin Meyer * *View full size image* The arms race between a virus and the bacteria it attacks has helped scientists better *understand one of the mysteries of evolution: How new traits evolve.* ... mais »

Alzheimer

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 1 dia atrás
Modelo ideal Por meio do estudo de neurônios criados a partir de células da pele de pacientes com Alzheimer, pesquisadores norte-americanos obtêm dados inéditos sobre mecanismos envolvidos no desenvolvimento da doença. O feito é tema da coluna deste mês de Stevens Rehen. Por: Stevens Rehen Publicado em 27/01/2012 | Atualizado em 27/01/2012 [image: Modelo ideal] Por meio da técnica de reprogramação celular, pesquisadores do Instituto de Pesquisas Salk, da Califórnia (EUA), criaram neurônios a partir de células da pele de pacientes com Alzheimer. (foto: Goldstein et al./ Nature) O estud... mais »

Risk factor by 55

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 3 dias atrás
Risk of Cardiac Death Pretty Much Set by 55 *By Crystal Phend, Senior Staff Writer, MedPage Today Published: January 25, 2012 Reviewed by Robert Jasmer, MD; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco.* Two or more major risk factors at age 55 predicted a 29.6% chance of death from cardiovascular disease by age 80 for men and 20.5% for women, Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, MD, of Northwestern University in Chicago, and colleagues found.Even a couple of traditional cardiovascular risk factors in middle age spell high lifetime risk for the heart, researche... mais »

Capitalism: Davos

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 4 dias atrás
DAVOS How to Save Capitalism By MICHAEL SCHUMAN | January 19, 2012 | * * [image: FABRICE COFFRINI / AFP / GETTY IMAGES] FABRICE COFFRINI / AFP / GETTY IMAGES A guard stands next to a logo of the World Economic Forum (WEF) at the Congress Center in the Swiss resort of Davos on January 24, 2012. As the global economic crisis enters its fourth excruciating year, just about everybody who can be blamed for the downturn has been blamed. Irresponsible bankers. Greedy corporate executives. Incompetent regulators. Bickering politicians. Underpaid Chinese workers. Overpaid Greek workers. Georg... mais »

violence, gender...

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 4 dias atrás
Male sex drive 'to blame for world's conflicts'The male sex drive is to blame for most of the world's conflicts from football hooliganism to religious disputes and even world wars, according to scientists. By Nick Collins, Science Correspondent [image: Male sex drive 'to blame for world's conflicts'] Men are programmed to be aggressive towards anyone they view as an outsider Photo: REX FEATURE The "male warrior" instinct means that men are programmed to be aggressive towards anyone they view as an outsider, a study claims. In evolutionary terms an instinct for violence against others... mais »

Underwater paradise

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 4 dias atrás
* *

Futurology

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 4 dias atrás
[image: Robot] Twenty top predictions for life 100 years from now Continue reading the main story In today's Magazine - How do Australians respond to shark attacks? - Hymn to the birds and trees - Three decades hiding in the Guam jungle - What do Scottish Americans think of independence? Last week we asked readers for their predictions of life in 100 years time. Inspired by ten 100-year predictions made by American civil engineer John Elfreth Watkins in 1900, many of you wrote in with your vision of the world in 2112. Many of the "strange, almost impossible" predictions... mais »

Preventable Risk Factors for NCD

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 4 dias atrás
Adult Mortality Attributable to Preventable Risk Factors for Non-Communicable Diseases and Injuries in Japan: A Comparative Risk Assessment *1* Department of Global Health Policy, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, *2* Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan, *3* Department of Social and Environmental Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan, *4* International University of Health and Welfare Graduate School, Tokyo, Japan, *5* Kitasato Cli... mais »

Thirdhand Smoke

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 5 dias atrás
'Thirdhand Smoke' May Be Bigger Health Hazard Than Previously Believed ScienceDaily (Jan. 12, 2011) — Scientists are reporting that so-called "thirdhand smoke" -- the invisible remains of cigarette smoke that deposits on carpeting, clothing, furniture and other surfaces -- may be even more of a health hazard than previously believed. The study, published in ACS' journal,*Environmental Science & Technology*, extends the known health risks of tobacco among people who do not smoke but encounter the smoke exhaled by smokers or released by smoldering cigarette butts./.../ *Scientists are ... mais »

virus + bacteria: evolution


Evolution of a trait. An image of the protein, LamB, on the surface of the bacterial cell. Scientists examined what happened with the virus could no longer infect the bacteria through this protein.
An image of a protein, LamB, found on the surface of the bacterial cell. Scientists examined what happened when a virus could no longer infect the bacteria through this protein.
CREDIT: Justin Meyer 
The arms race between a virus and the bacteria it attacks has helped scientists better understand one of the mysteries of evolution: How new traits evolve.
In a series of experiments, the bacteria-infecting viruses repeatedly acquired the ability to attack their host bacteria through a different "doorway," or receptor on the bacteria's cellular membrane, explained Justin Meyer, the lead researcher and a graduate student at Michigan State University. [Video: The Virus Mutates]

Saturday, January 28, 2012

Alzheimer


Modelo ideal

Por meio do estudo de neurônios criados a partir de células da pele de pacientes com Alzheimer, pesquisadores norte-americanos obtêm dados inéditos sobre mecanismos envolvidos no desenvolvimento da doença. O feito é tema da coluna deste mês de Stevens Rehen.
Por: Stevens Rehen
Publicado em 27/01/2012 | Atualizado em 27/01/2012
Modelo ideal
Por meio da técnica de reprogramação celular, pesquisadores do Instituto de Pesquisas Salk, da Califórnia (EUA), criaram neurônios a partir de células da pele de pacientes com Alzheimer. (foto: Goldstein et al./ Nature)
O estudo das doenças do cérebro humano é fascinante, porém extremamente desafiador.
O neurocientista tem as seguintes opções: 1) analisar o tecido nervoso de pessoas já falecidas, material difícil de ser obtido e que representa na maioria das vezes estágios terminais das neuropatologias; 2) usar animais de experimentação, que, apesar de extremamente úteis, em muitos casos são incapazes de reproduzir várias das características dessas doenças; 3) utilizar células do sangue de pacientes acometidos por doenças neurodegenerativas ou demências. Neste último caso, apesar de essas células ajudarem na identificação de marcadores genéticos dessas patologias, a maioria das características metabólicas de doenças que acometem o cérebro não necessariamente é observada fora dele./.../

Thursday, January 26, 2012

Risk factor by 55


Risk of Cardiac Death Pretty Much Set by 55

By Crystal Phend, Senior Staff Writer, MedPage Today Published: January 25, 2012
Reviewed by Robert Jasmer, MD; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco.
Two or more major risk factors at age 55 predicted a 29.6% chance of death from cardiovascular disease by age 80 for men and 20.5% for women, Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, MD, of Northwestern University in Chicago, and colleagues found.Even a couple of traditional cardiovascular risk factors in middle age spell high lifetime risk for the heart, researchers affirmed.
But for 55-year-olds with a clean bill of cardiovascular health, lifetime risk was only 4.7% for men and 6.4% for women in the analysis of patient-level data from more than 250,000 individuals across 18 longitudinal studies.
The effect was similar for heart attacks and strokes and regardless of race or era in which one was born, the group reported in the Jan. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
Risk assessment typically considers only short-term risk, such as 10-year risk with the Framingham prediction tool, the group noted.
"However, the majority of adults in the U.S. who are considered to be at low risk for cardiovascular disease in the short term are actually at high risk across their remaining lifespan," Lloyd-Jones and colleagues wrote./.../

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Capitalism: Davos


How to Save Capitalism


FABRICE COFFRINI / AFP / GETTY IMAGES
FABRICE COFFRINI / AFP / GETTY IMAGES
A guard stands next to a logo of the World Economic Forum (WEF) at the Congress Center in the Swiss resort of Davos on January 24, 2012.
As the global economic crisis enters its fourth excruciating year, just about everybody who can be blamed for the downturn has been blamed. Irresponsible bankers. Greedy corporate executives. Incompetent regulators. Bickering politicians. Underpaid Chinese workers. Overpaid Greek workers. George W. Bush. Ben Bernanke. Angela Merkel. Credit-rating agencies. The euro. Spendthrift American consumers. After the worst financial disaster since the Great Depression of the 1930s, there has been no shortage of vilification to go around. With another grim year likely ahead and no ready solutions in sight, a new target has arisen in the public’s crosshairs: capitalism itself.

violence, gender...


Male sex drive 'to blame for world's conflicts'

The male sex drive is to blame for most of the world's conflicts from football hooliganism to religious disputes and even world wars, according to scientists.


Male sex drive 'to blame for world's conflicts'
Men are programmed to be aggressive towards anyone they view as an outsider Photo: REX FEATURE

The "male warrior" instinct means that men are programmed to be aggressive towards anyone they view as an outsider, a study claims.
In evolutionary terms an instinct for violence against others helped early men improve their status and gain more access to mates, but in modern terms this can translate into large-scale wars.
In contrast women are naturally equipped with a "tend and befriend" attitude which means they seek to resolve conflicts peacefully in order to protect their children, researchers said.
The study, published in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, is a review of evolutionary evidence for the so-called "male warrior hypothesis"./.../

Underwater paradise




Futurology


Robot

Twenty top predictions for life 100 years from now

Last week we asked readers for their predictions of life in 100 years time. Inspired by ten 100-year predictions made by American civil engineer John Elfreth Watkins in 1900, many of you wrote in with your vision of the world in 2112.
Many of the "strange, almost impossible" predictions made by Watkins came true. Here is what futurologists Ian Pearson (IP) and Patrick Tucker (PT) think of your ideas./.../

Preventable Risk Factors for NCD


Adult Mortality Attributable to Preventable Risk Factors for Non-Communicable Diseases and Injuries in Japan: A Comparative Risk Assessment

1 Department of Global Health Policy, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, 2 Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Department of Social and Environmental Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan, 4 International University of Health and Welfare Graduate School, Tokyo, Japan, 5 Kitasato Clinical Research Center, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Japan,6 Department of Diabetes and Metabolic Medicine, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, 7 Department of Epidemiology and International Health, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, 8 Cancer Information Services and Surveillance Division, Center for Cancer Control and Information Services, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan, 9 Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America, 10 MRC-HPA Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United KingdomNayu Ikeda1*Manami Inoue2Hiroyasu Iso3Shunya Ikeda4Toshihiko Satoh5Mitsuhiko Noda6Tetsuya Mizoue7Hironori Imano3Eiko Saito1Kota Katanoda8,Tomotaka Sobue8Shoichiro Tsugane2Mohsen Naghavi9,Majid Ezzati10Kenji Shibuya1

Abstract Top

Background

The population of Japan has achieved the longest life expectancy in the world. To further improve population health, consistent and comparative evidence on mortality attributable to preventable risk factors is necessary for setting priorities for health policies and programs. Although several past studies have quantified the impact of individual risk factors in Japan, to our knowledge no study has assessed and compared the effects of multiple modifiable risk factors for non-communicable diseases and injuries using a standard framework. We estimated the effects of 16 risk factors on cause-specific deaths and life expectancy in Japan.

Methods and Findings

We obtained data on risk factor exposures from the National Health and Nutrition Survey and epidemiological studies, data on the number of cause-specific deaths from vital records adjusted for ill-defined codes, and data on relative risks from epidemiological studies and meta-analyses. We applied a comparative risk assessment framework to estimate effects of excess risks on deaths and life expectancy at age 40 y. In 2007, tobacco smoking and high blood pressure accounted for 129,000 deaths (95% CI: 115,000–154,000) and 104,000 deaths (95% CI: 86,000–119,000), respectively, followed by physical inactivity (52,000 deaths, 95% CI: 47,000–58,000), high blood glucose (34,000 deaths, 95% CI: 26,000–43,000), high dietary salt intake (34,000 deaths, 95% CI: 27,000–39,000), and alcohol use (31,000 deaths, 95% CI: 28,000–35,000). In recent decades, cancer mortality attributable to tobacco smoking has increased in the elderly, while stroke mortality attributable to high blood pressure has declined. Life expectancy at age 40 y in 2007 would have been extended by 1.4 y for both sexes (men, 95% CI: 1.3–1.6; women, 95% CI: 1.2–1.7) if exposures to multiple cardiovascular risk factors had been reduced to their optimal levels as determined by a theoretical-minimum-risk exposure distribution.

Conclusions

Tobacco smoking and high blood pressure are the two major risk factors for adult mortality from non-communicable diseases and injuries in Japan. There is a large potential population health gain if multiple risk factors are jointly controlled./.../

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

Thirdhand Smoke


'Thirdhand Smoke' May Be Bigger Health Hazard Than Previously Believed

ScienceDaily (Jan. 12, 2011) — Scientists are reporting that so-called "thirdhand smoke" -- the invisible remains of cigarette smoke that deposits on carpeting, clothing, furniture and other surfaces -- may be even more of a health hazard than previously believed. The study, published in ACS' journal,Environmental Science & Technology, extends the known health risks of tobacco among people who do not smoke but encounter the smoke exhaled by smokers or released by smoldering cigarette butts./.../
Scientists are reporting that so-called "thirdhand smoke" -- the invisible remains of cigarette smoke that deposits on carpeting, clothing, furniture and other surfaces -- may be even more of a health hazard than previously believed. (Credit: iStockphoto/Rosemarie Gearhart)enlarge

Sunday, January 22, 2012

2533 - AMICOR 14


Amazonia

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 2 minutos atrás
[image: LatinContent/Getty Images]LATINCONTENT/GETTY IMAGES FORESTS Amazonia: What’s Happening to the World’s Biggest Rain Forest? By BRYAN WALSH | @bryanrwalsh | January 18, 2012 | Deforestation in the Brazilian rain forest is slowing, but it's still happening—with major consequences for the global environment. I’d say you have to see the Amazon for yourself to understand how vast it is, but I’ve been there—and even I can’t imagine it. The rain forest is more than 2 million sq. miles—two-thirds the size of the continental United States—and the river system of the gigantic basin pro... mais »

Sympathetic Activity: Hypertension

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 8 minutos atrás
From Medscape Education CardiologySympathetic Activity in the Pathophysiology of Hypertension Murray D. Esler, MBBS, PhD The goal of this activity is to provide information on hypertensive patients and discuss issues and trial data as well as how sympathetic activity can be introduced in a patient's management. *Learning Objectives* 1. Explain how the renal nerves can elevate central sympathetic drive and affect blood pressure control 2. Differentiate the role of afferent and efferent renal nerves 3. Review current treatments and experimental interventions aimed at the ... mais »

mental illness 1:5

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 15 horas atrás
National report finds one-in-five Americans experienced mental illness in the past yearSubstance dependence and abuse rates higher among those experiencing mental illnessA new national report reveals that 45.9 million American adults aged 18 or older, or 20 percent of this age group, experienced mental illness in the past year. The rate of mental illness was more than twice as high among those aged 18 to 25 (29.9 percent) than among those aged 50 and older (14.3 percent). Adult women were also more likely than men to have experienced mental illness in the past year (23 percent vers... mais »

EMPHYSEMA

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 15 horas atrás
EMPHYSEMA Cigarette Smoke Induction of Osteopontin (SPP1) Mediates TH17 Inflammation in Human and Experimental Emphysema 1. Ming Shan1,2, 2. Xiaoyi Yuan1,2, 3. Li-zhen Song1, 4. Luz Roberts1, 5. Nazanin Zarinkamar1, 6. Alexander Seryshev1, 7. Yiqun Zhang3, 8. Susan Hilsenbeck3, 9. Seon-Hee Chang4, 10. Chen Dong4, 11. David B. Corry1,2,5,* and 12. Farrah Kheradmand1,2,5,* 1Department of Medicine, Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA ABSTRACT Smoking-related lung diseases are among th... mais »

CONFLICT OF INTEREST

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 1 dia atrás
Who Else Is Paying Your Doctor?Published: January 20, 2012 It took longer than expected, but the Obama administration is finally poised to enact badly needed regulations requiring that the manufacturers of drugs, medical devices and medical supplies disclose all payments they make to doctors or teaching hospitals. The information, which would be posted on a government Web site, will allow patients to decide whether they need to worry about any possible conflicts of interest. - U.S. to Force Drug Firms to Report Money Paid to Doctors(January 17, 2012) Such payments can be for ... mais »

Tobacco: costs & savings

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 2 dias atrás
The Return on Investment of a Medicaid Tobacco Cessation Program in Massachusetts - Article - Metrics - Related Content - Comments: 1 1 Department of Health Policy, School of Public Health and Health Services, The George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia, United States of America, 2 Center for Health Policy Research, School of Public Health and Health Services, The George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia, United States of AmericaPatrick Richard1¤, Kristina West1,Leighton Ku2* ** Abstract TopBackground and Objective A high pr... mais »

Exercise

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 2 dias atrás
Science 20 January 2012: Vol. 335 no. 6066 p. 281 DOI: 10.1126/science.335.6066.281 - NEWS FOCUS AUTOPHAGY Explaining Exercise 1. Ken Garber* Exercise has many benefits, but the mechanisms behind them remain murky. Because autophagy’s recycling of cellular contents helps cells meet energy demands, researchers wondered whether exercise triggers autophagy and if that could somehow account for exercise’s benefits. In the December issue of Autophagy, an Italian research team reported the first evidence that exercise induces autophagy in the skeletal muscles of mice. This week ... mais »

Sexual Activity and Cardiovascular Disease

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 2 dias atrás
*AHA Scientific Statement* ----------------------------------------------------------------- *Sexual Activity and Cardiovascular Disease: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association* Glenn N. Levine, Elaine E. Steinke, Faisal G. Bakaeen, Biykem Bozkurt, Melvin D. Cheitlin, Jamie Beth Conti, Elyse Foster, Tiny Jaarsma, Robert A. Kloner, Richard A. Lange, Stacy Tessler Lindau, Barry J. Maron, Debra K. Moser, E. Magnus Ohman, Allen D. Seftel, William J. Stewart on behalf of the American Heart Association Council on Clinical Cardiology, Council on Cardiovascular Nursing, ... mais »

Twitter

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 2 dias atrás
Nine Things You Didn’t Know About TwitterBy PAUL BOUTINPublished: January 18, 2012 Enlarge This ImageTwitter, the minimalist-format social network that claims to have 100 million users, has built its reputation around its simplicity. Members can post to the service only in text messages of 140 characters or less. They can include a link to another site, or to a photo or video. They can repost other users’ messages on their own pages. They can send each other equally spartan private messages. That’s about it — or so it seems. Dongyun Lee Look more closely, and you’ll find that Twitter... mais »

Alzheimer

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 3 dias atrás
Rules Updated for Postmortem Dx of Alzheimer's By John Gever, Senior Editor, MedPage Today Published: January 18, 2012 Reviewed by Dori F. Zaleznik, MD; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston. * * - A new guideline for the National Institute on Aging and the Alzeimer's Association recommends the "ABC" system for standardizing neuropathologic staging of Alzheimer's brain pathology on autopsy. - Note that the "ABC" system scores beta-amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and neuritic plaques for an assessment of neuropathologi... mais »

Milky Way

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 3 dias atrás
*Do Invisible Galaxies Swirl Around the Milky Way?* By MICHAEL D. LEMONICK Thursday, Jan. 19, 2012 NASA / MCT / Getty Images in Unless you're some kind of space nut, you're probably entirely unaware that the Milky Way, our home galaxy, isn't traveling through the cosmos alone. It's being shadowed by a litter of nearly a dozen dwarf galaxies that are far smaller and dimmer — a pack of cubs, you might say, yapping around the edges of the Mama Grizzly. If you widen your gaze to include a much larger swath of space, you'll find what's called the Local Group — a half-dozen full-size ga... mais »

conflicts of interest

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 5 dias atrás
QUOTATION OF THE DAY "Patients want to know they are getting treatment based on medical evidence, not a lunch or a financial relationship." ALLAN J. COUKELL, a consumer advocate at the Pew Charitable Trusts, on a rule that would require drug companies to disclose payments they make to doctors. U.S. to Force Drug Firms to Report Money Paid to Doctors By ROBERT PEAR Published: January 16, 2012 WASHINGTON — To head off medical conflicts of interest, the Obama administration is poised to require drug companies to disclose the payments they make to doctors for research, consulting, speak... mais »

About Dying

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 5 dias atrás
What Doctors Know — and We Can Learn — About Dying Physicians are more likely to sign advance directives and avoid rescue measures at the end of their lives By SHANNON BROWNLEE | @ShannonBrownlee | January 16, 2012 | * * [image: Getty Images] GETTY IMAGES Brownlee's latest book is*Overtreated: Why Too Much Medicine is Making Us Sicker and Poorer*. Last month, an essay posted by retired physician Ken Murray called “How Doctors Die” got a huge amount of attention, some negative but mostly positive. Murray tells the story of an orthopedic surgeon who, after being diagnosed with pancreat... mais »

O FUTURO DAS CIDADES

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 6 dias atrás
"O futuro das cidades", por Jean-Pierre Garnier *Indicado pela Dra. Maria Inês Reinert Azambuja* Le Monde Diplomatique *A luta por espaço * * * *A chegada, aos bairros operários, de grupos sociais pertencentes às classes de maior poder aquisitivo é vista, com frequência, como uma invasão. Para a maior parte dos moradores afetados, essa mudança significa especulação financeira e imobiliária, o que acelera sua expulsão e substituição por cidadãos mais abastados * por Jean-Pierre Garnier

Leucemia linfoide aguda

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 6 dias atrás
Causa revelada: leucemia linfoide aguda Pesquisadores descobrem mutação que provoca leucemia infantil e já estudam novos medicamentos para tratar a doença. A pesquisa é tema da seção ‘Em dia’ da edição atual da revista CH. Por: Sofia Moutinho Publicado em 12/01/2012 | Atualizado em 12/01/2012 [image: Causa revelada] Um aspirado de medula óssea de um paciente com leucemia. A doença é o tipo de câncer mais comum entre crianças e adolescentes e faz cerca de 2 mil novas vítimas por ano no Brasil. (imagem: Mary Ann Thompson) Uma equipe de pesquisadores do Brasil e de Portugal, em colaboraçã... mais »