Sunday, September 30, 2012

2569 - AMICOR 15


World Heart Day 2012

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 33 segundos atrás
World Heart Day 2012 TAKE ACTION TO SAVE THE LIVES OF THE WOMEN AND CHILDREN YOU LOVE

Sulzberger, a Times Publisher, Dies

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 11 minutos atrás
*Sulsberger Dies* Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, a Times Publisher, Dies « Previous 1 of 16 Next » - FACEBOOK - TWITTER - GOOGLE+ - E-MAIL - SHARE Arthur Ochs Sulzberger in 1992. For 34 years, Mr. Sulzberger shaped the destiny of The New York Times as its publisher and as chairman and chief executive of the parent company. The portrait on the wall behind him depicts his grandfather, Adolph S. Ochs, who bought The New York Times in 1896. Credit: Burk Uzzle for The New York Times RELATED - Article: Publisher Who Transformed The Times for New Era - Video: Remembering A... mais »

FLU

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 12 minutos atrás
Indicado por Dr, Luiz Gustavo Guilhermano *Comparison between influenza pandemics of 1918 and 2009 from the perspective of **Hospital São Vicente de Paulo in Passo Fundo, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil* Paula da Rocha Jaskulski1, Mariluce da Rocha Jaskulski2, Luiz Gustavo Guilhermano3 1 Acadêmica de Medicina da Universidade de Passo Fundo. 2 Professora Titular do Departamento de Ciências da Saúde da Universidade Regional Integrada do Alto Uruguai e das Missões, Campus de Erechim. 3 Professor Assistente do Departamento de Psiquiatria da Faculdade de Medicina da Pontifícia Universidade Catól... mais »

Are We Getting Smarter?

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 1 dia atrás
How We Know That Humans Are Getting Smarter [Excerpt] In this excerpt from his new book, James R. Flynn explains how he came to understand how our minds have gained in cognitive skills over the 20th century By James R. Flynn 2 inShare [image: Are We Getting Smarter? Rising IQ in the Twenty-First Century, James R. Flynn]**Are We Getting Smarter? Rising IQ in the Twenty-First Century*, by James R. Flynn. Copyright © 2012 James R. Flynn. Reprinted with the permission of Cambridge University Press.*Image: Cambridge University Press *Reprinted from* Are We Getting Smarter? R... mais »

Vitamin D : Alzheimer

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 1 dia atrás
Low Vitamin D Linked to Alzheimer's Disease Pauline Anderson Authors and Disclosures - Information from Industry Dose reduction is not always an option when trying to meet individual patient needs in relapsing MS Read about dosing flexibility September 28, 2012 — Yet another study has linked low vitamin D levels with significant health issues — in this case, poor cognition. In this latest systematic review of the literature, people with Alzheimer's disease (AD) had lower concentrations of vitamin D than those without AD, and better cognitive test results were linked to high... mais »

neighborhood and health

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 3 dias atrás
Where You Live May Boost Your Sense of Well-Being Mental health improved when families moved from very poor neighborhoods, study found Thursday, September 20, 2012 Related MedlinePlus Pages - Health Disparities - Mental Health THURSDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- When families were given vouchers to move from impoverished neighborhoods to ones that were less poor, the adults in those families experienced lasting improvements in mental health and well-being, new research says. And, these improvements occurred even though the adults weren't making significantly more money afte... mais »

WHF: News Brief

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 3 dias atrás
Introduction from the EditorIssue number: 12 Professor Kathryn A. Taubert Chief Science Officer World Heart Federation *Welcome to issue 12 of the CVD News Brief!* In this News Brief, you can read about data from the Whitehall II study which has demonstrated for the first time that regular physical activity reduces inflammatory markers thereby helping to prevent loss of muscle mass, decline in physical function, and the development of cardiovascular disease in later life.You will also be interested to read that a study recently published in the Lancet shows the impact of a sedentary l... mais »

13.2 billion years

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 3 dias atrás
Hubble Telescope Reveals Farthermost View into the Universe The "time tunnel into the distant past" gives us a glimpse of galaxies as they looked up to 13.2 billion years ago By Clara Moskowitz and SPACE.com [image: TechMediaNetwork] *LOOKING BACK:* Called the eXtreme Deep Field, or XDF, the photo was assembled by combining 10 years of NASA Hubble Space Telescope photographs taken of a patch of sky at the center of the original Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The XDF is a small fraction of sky area, but provides a "core sample" of the heavens over 13 billion light-years.Image: NASA, ESA, G.... mais »

L. E Robinson Achutti: co-autor

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 4 dias atrás
[image: Diálogo / Fotografia] Diálogo / Fotografia Autor: Tiburi, Marcia Editora: Senac São Paulo Categoria: Artes / Fotografia Em um mundo cada vez mais marcado pela pre¬sença de câmeras digitais, muitas vezes acopladas a celulares e tablets, discutir a fotografia como uma atividade especializada, pertencente ao mundo das artes, pode parecer, para muitos, fora de contexto... [LEIA+] Atualmente, todos nós podemos tirar uma fotogra¬fia, editá-la e, depois, compartilhá-la e exibi-la em álbuns, porta-retratos e redes sociais, como uma forma de tomar nota da vida cotidiana ou de guardar l... mais »

Neighborhoods...

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 5 dias atrás
Physical And Mental Health Boosted By Move To Less Impoverished Neighborhoods Main Category: Psychology / Psychiatry Also Included In: Mental Health; Public Health Article Date: 24 Sep 2012 - 1:00 PDT Moving from a high-poverty to lower-poverty neighborhood spurs long-term gains in the physical and mental health of low-income adults, as well as a substantial increase in their happiness, despite not improving economic self-sufficiency, according to a new study published in *Science* by researchers at the University of Chicago and partners at other institutions. Although moving into... mais »

medical 'code of silence'

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 5 dias atrás
Exposing the medical 'code of silence' By *Libby Lewis*, CNN September 21, 2012 -- Updated 1924 GMT (0324 HKT) [image: Surgeon and author Marty Makary (second from right) with colleagues at Johns Hopkins Hospital.] Surgeon and author Marty Makary (second from right) with colleagues at Johns Hopkins Hospital. *STORY HIGHLIGHTS* - A surgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital has some ideas about what is wrong with medicine - Marty Makary says doctors and hospitals should talk more openly about medical mistakes - Patients should push doctors and hospitals for information to make ... mais »

The Clinton Global Initiative

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 5 dias atrás
CGI: Designing—and Powering—a Better World The Clinton Global Initiative kicks off with a paean to the importance of designing solutions that can scale up. By BRYAN WALSH | @bryanrwalsh | September 24, 2012 | 1 [image: Getty Images] GETTY IMAGES Global problems—in health, in the economy, in the environment—begin and end with design. An intelligently designed system can make success inevitable, and a poorly designed one can make it impossible. Too often we react to global threats after the fact, our responses hamstrung by underperforming and outmoded systems. If we’re going to fix the... mais »

Exercício é Remédio

Aloyzio AchuttiemAMICOR - 6 dias atrás

World Heart Day 2012

World Heart Day 2012


Sulzberger, a Times Publisher, Dies

Sulsberger Dies

Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, a Times Publisher, Dies

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Arthur Ochs Sulzberger in 1992. For 34 years, Mr. Sulzberger shaped the destiny of The New York Times as its publisher and as chairman and chief executive of the parent company. The portrait on the wall behind him depicts his grandfather, Adolph S. Ochs, who bought The New York Times in 1896.
Credit: Burk Uzzle for The New York Times

FLU


Indicado por Dr, Luiz Gustavo Guilhermano
Comparison between influenza pandemics of 1918 and 2009 from the perspective of Hospital São Vicente de Paulo in Passo Fundo, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
Paula da Rocha Jaskulski1, Mariluce da Rocha Jaskulski2, Luiz Gustavo Guilhermano3
1 Acadêmica de Medicina da Universidade de Passo Fundo.
2 Professora Titular do Departamento de Ciências da Saúde da Universidade Regional Integrada do Alto Uruguai e das Missões, Campus de Erechim.
3 Professor Assistente do Departamento de Psiquiatria da Faculdade de Medicina da Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul.
Ex-presidente da Associação Gaúcha de História da Medicina.
Trabalho apresentado à II Jornada Gaúcha de História da Medicina, sede da Associação Médica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre/RS,
em outubro de 2010.
RESUMO
Objetivos: Comparar a pandemia de gripe espanhola, que coincidiu com o ano de fundação do Hospital São Vicente de Paulo, localizado na cidade de Passo Fundo, RS, com a pandemia de gripe A vivida em 2009, ambas causadas pelo vírus Influenza A H1N1.
Fonte de dados: Base de dados do Hospital São Vicente de Paulo (referente a 1918 e 2009) assim como seu site na internet, Arquivo Histórico Regional da Universidade de Passo Fundo, jornais, revistas e relatórios de 1918-1919 e 2009-2010, dados da literatura (principalmente do livro “Banalização da Morte na Cidade Calada”, de Janete Silveira Abrão), periódicos científicos e sites oficiais da internet (Ministério da Saúde, Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística, Organização Mundial da Saúde).
Síntese dos dados: Uma pandemia de gripe espanhola ocorreu no ano de 1918 e causou a morte de mais de 20 milhões de pessoas em apenas um ano. Quase um século depois, surge a pandemia pelo vírus Influenza A H1N1, provocando cerca de 18 mil mortes entre abril de 2009 e maio de 2010. Este trabalho evidencia consequências dessas pandemias na cidade de Passo Fundo, especialmente no Hospital São Vicente de Paulo.
Conclusões: Há consideráveis semelhanças entre as pandemias de 1918 e de 2009, sendo que ambas deixaram fortes marcas no Hospital São Vicente de Paulo e na cidade de Passo Fundo.
DESCRITORES: VÍRUS DA INFLUENZA A SUBTIPO H1N1; INFLUENZA HUMANA; GRIPE; HISTÓRIA DA MEDICINA; REGISTROS MÉDICOS./.../

Friday, September 28, 2012

Are We Getting Smarter?


How We Know That Humans Are Getting Smarter [Excerpt]

In this excerpt from his new book, James R. Flynn explains how he came to understand how our minds have gained in cognitive skills over the 20th century







 

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Are We Getting Smarter? Rising IQ in the Twenty-First Century, James R. FlynnAre We Getting Smarter? Rising IQ in the Twenty-First Century, by James R. Flynn. Copyright © 2012 James R. Flynn. Reprinted with the permission of Cambridge University Press.Image: Cambridge University Press

Reprinted from Are We Getting Smarter? Rising IQ in the Twenty-First Century, by James R. Flynn. Copyright © 2012 James R. Flynn. Reprinted with the permission of Cambridge University Press.
The phenomenon of IQ gains has created unnecessary controversy because of conceptual confusion. Imagine an archaeologist from the distant future who excavates our civilization and finds a record of performances over time on measures of marksmanship. The test is always the same, that is, how many bullets you can put in a target 100 meters away in a minute. Records from 1865 (the U.S. Civil War) show the best score to be five bullets in the target, records from 1898 (Spanish-American War) show 10, and records from 1918 (World War I) show 50./.../

Vitamin D : Alzheimer


 
September 28, 2012 — Yet another study has linked low vitamin D levels with significant health issues — in this case, poor cognition.
In this latest systematic review of the literature, people with Alzheimer's disease (AD) had lower concentrations of vitamin D than those without AD, and better cognitive test results were linked to higher vitamin D concentrations.
Overall, the results provide sufficient evidence to warrant further investigation to determine whether a cause-and-effect relationship exists, said lead author Cynthia Balion, PhD, a clinical biochemist and associate professor, Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
"I think we have really good data now to make it clear that people need to do the interventional studies and see whether or not giving vitamin D helps people at higher risk for developing cognitive decline," Dr. Balion toldMedscape Medical News.
The new review was published in the September 25 issue of Neurology.
Included Studies
Dr. Balion and colleagues searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, PsychINFO, and the Cochrane Central database for English-language studies of adults that measured vitamin D levels and included validated tests (for example, global function, executive function, psychomotor speed, attention, memory, or intelligence) as a measure of cognitive function. They accepted all recognized diagnostic criteria.
The review encompassed 37 studies, including 21 cross-sectional, 10 case-control, 1 before-after with a comparison group, and 2 prospective cohort studies, as well as 3 randomized, controlled trials (RCTs). The study sample sizes varied from 27 to 17,099 participants.
Thirty studies included only older participants, generally age 65 years or older, whereas 9 studies included only women and 2, only men. Exclusion criteria varied across studies (and included, for example, nutritional supplements, such as calcium and vitamin D; hormonal treatment; and diseases such as kidney disease, liver disease, and osteoporosis.)
All studies measured 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations except for 1 that measured 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1.25(OH)D]; 4 studies measured both. Various vitamin D cut points were classified as deficient or insufficient (<25 50="50" nmol="nmol" or="or" sufficient="sufficient" to="to">75 nmol/L).
In 14 studies, the cognition outcome included the diagnosis of dementia, which was most commonly defined according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders or National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke–Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association criteria. Of the 24 studies that included a test of cognitive function, the most commonly used test was the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE).
In most cases, the relationship between vitamin D and cognition was assessed by comparing mean vitamin D concentrations between patients diagnosed with dementia and controls or mean neuropsychological test scores between vitamin D groups.
2 Meta-Analyses
There were sufficient data to conduct 2 meta-analyses. The first compared the mean 25(OH)D concentration between AD and control groups. Six cross-sectional or case-control studies comparing data from 888 participants demonstrated a lower mean 25(OH)D concentration in patients with AD than in controls. The mean difference was −15.0 nmol/L (95% confidence interval [CI], −26.2 to −3.9 nmol/L).
The researchers found that an important determinant of the statistically significant heterogeneity was the method of 25(OH)D measurement used. The competitive protein-binding assay (CPBA) explained the heterogeneity, but this method has been withdrawn from commercial use because of accuracy issues, said Dr. Balion.
When the analysis was restricted to the 4 studies that used methods other than the CPBA, the overall difference between the AD and control groups was −6.2 nmol/L (95% CI, −10.6 to −1.8 nmol/L), with results consistent across studies. Similar results were found when studies comparing any dementia against a control group used methods other than the CPBA to measure vitamin D.
Dr. Balion stressed the need for standardization of methods of measuring 25(OH)D and noted that relevant organizations are addressing this issue. In the meantime, it's important to consider the type of analytical method being used when comparing results from different studies, she said.
Lack of true standardization is "a big problem in the field right now," commented Raj C. Shah, MD, a geriatrician and associate professor of family medicine, Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois. "It's important to realize that all measurements of vitamin D are not equal."
The second meta-analysis compared mean MMSE scores between participants with 25(OH)D concentrations less than 50 mmol/L and those with concentrations of 50 mmol/L or greater; 50 mmol/L is the most common cut-point reported in these studies and is often used to define vitamin D deficiency. Eight cross-sectional and case-control studies, which included data from 2749 participants, contributed to this analysis. Taken together, these studies showed a higher average MMSE score in participants with higher vitamin D concentrations.
The average difference in MMSE score was 1.2 (95% CI, 0.5 to 1.9), although there was statistically significant heterogeneity. None of the subgroup analyses (for example, percentage of female participants, adjustment for at least age and sex) explained this heterogeneity.
Dr. Balion noted that except for 2 studies, the average MMSE score of the groups was very similar. When 4 studies that used another type of cognitive screening tool were added, the results did not change substantially.
Of the 2 cohort studies included in the analysis, the 1 that included only men reported no significant association between vitamin D and baseline cognitive impairment; in the other, however, participants with a deficiency in vitamin D had an increased risk for substantial cognitive decline over 6 years compared with those who had sufficient concentrations of the vitamin. As for the RCTs, the only study to use a supplement of vitamin D alone found no significant between-group differences for the single cognitive measure used.
Comprehensive Analysis
According to Dr. Balion, the results of this current review differ from those of 2 earlier ones because it was more comprehensive in its search strategy and in its inclusion criteria, which resulted in more articles screened (3229 vs 99 for a previous review). It also included more studies (37 vs 5 for the previous reviews). "We decided not to be limited in what we looked at," she said.
Dr. Balion pointed out that some factors affecting vitamin D concentrations, including skin pigmentation, age, genetics, and time of sun exposure and testing, were not considered by some studies. As well, she said, reverse causation can't be ruled out because older people may have poor nutrition and spend less time exposed to sunlight, a major source of vitamin D. Despite these limitations, "I'm pretty happy saying that vitamin D plays a role in brain health," she said.
How exactly vitamin D protects the brain is not clear, but research suggests that vitamin D acts as a neurosteroid, said Dr. Balion. At the molecular level, the brain can synthesize the active form of vitamin D [1,25(OH)D] within several cell types and regions, predominantly in the hypothalamus and large neurons in the substantia nigra. Many genes are regulated by vitamin D, which contributes to neuroprotection by modulating the production of such things as nerve growth factor, and regulating neurotransmitters.
The ideal concentration of vitamin D is also not really known, said Dr. Balion. "We tried to assess that with the data that we had from all these papers, and some studies show there might be this magic cut point and other studies did not really find a cut point. Most studies aren't designed to look for that because they're not outcome studies."
However, she noted that 2 cut points are recommended worldwide: 50 and 75 nmol/L. Canada, for example, recommends the upper level for bone health.
Physicians should recommend supplements for patients not getting sufficient vitamin D, said Dr. Balion. Many jurisdictions, including Canada, recommend 600 IU of vitamin D daily for older children and adults; recommendations differ for younger children and pregnant women.
Vitamin D Testing
Ontario's universal healthcare system does not provide for vitamin D testing except for certain conditions (osteoporosis, osteopenia, rickets, malabsorption syndrome, renal disease, or taking medications that affect vitamin D metabolism) because the evidence is not yet established, said Dr. Balion.
The United States has recommendations similar to Canada's, Dr. Shah notes. Americans are becoming more aware of vitamin D's health benefits and are taking more supplements; however, although the vitamin is fat soluble, and so may be safer than some other vitamins when taken at higher doses, Dr. Shah noted that it can still lead to muscle pains and gastrointestinal tract problems.
When asked to comment on this review, Dr. Shah said, "it helps clinicians like me and researchers to understand where the state of science is in this field, and it tells us we have a lot more work to do." He noted that of the 37 papers included in the review, only a few were clinical trials.
However, that may be changing. VITAL (VITamin D and OmegA-3 TriaL), a large 5-year clinical trial sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, is randomly assigning 20,000 people across the United States. The placebo-controlled trial will investigate whether vitamin D or omega fatty acid affects various aspects of health, including cognition.
Dr. Shah raised several important issues pertaining to the analysis. For one thing, results of vitamin D studies may depend on where participants live and the time of the year that testing was done.
He also noted that most studies were probably not done in diverse populations. "I suspect that subjects were mainly Caucasian," but because the United States has an increasingly diverse population, "we need to have measures of these effects in various older adults."
Dr. Shah said that as with any meta-analysis, some publication bias probably exists, with negative studies not being published or available for review.
He also questioned whether intervening through supplementation to arrive at a target vitamin D level would affect outcomes. He used the example of high-density lipoprotein, where experts believed that raising levels would reduce risks for heart disease. Preliminary research suggests that such efforts not only might not produce the expected result but also may cause some harm in terms of adverse effects.
The study was funded by the Ontario Research Coalition of Research Institutes/Centers on Health & Aging, Ontario Ministry of Long-Term Care. Dr. Balion receives research support from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), and the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. For disclosures for other authors, see original paper. Dr. Shah has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.
Neurology. 2012;79:1397-1405. Abstract
 

Thursday, September 27, 2012

neighborhood and health


Where You Live May Boost Your Sense of Well-Being

Mental health improved when families moved from very poor neighborhoods, study found
Thursday, September 20, 2012
Related MedlinePlus Pages
THURSDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- When families were given vouchers to move from impoverished neighborhoods to ones that were less poor, the adults in those families experienced lasting improvements in mental health and well-being, new research says.
And, these improvements occurred even though the adults weren't making significantly more money after their move.
"If you take a family in a high poverty neighborhood and move them to an area where the poverty level is about 13 percent less than where they're currently living, the increase in happiness is about equal to the gain in happiness from a rise of about $13,000 in income," said study author Jens Ludwig, the McCormick Foundation Professor of Social Service Administration, Law and Public Policy at the University of Chicago.
And, since the average income was only around $13,000 to start with, the equivalent of a $13,000 increase in income would have a huge impact, she added.
Results of the study are published in the Sept. 21 issue of the journal Science./.../

WHF: News Brief


Introduction from the EditorIssue number: 12
Professor Kathryn A. Taubert
Chief Science Officer
World Heart Federation
Welcome to issue 12 of the CVD News Brief!
In this News Brief, you can read about data from the Whitehall II study which has demonstrated for the first time that regular physical activity reduces inflammatory markers thereby helping to prevent loss of muscle mass, decline in physical function, and the development of cardiovascular disease in later life.You will also be interested to read that a study recently published in the Lancet shows the impact of a sedentary lifestyle on major non-communicable diseases and how much disease could be averted if people took steps to become more active.
Further, results from the Singapore Chinese Health Study show that increased consumption of fast food among Chinese Singaporeans is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and death due to coronary heart disease.
In addition, a recent study by Toriola and colleagues shows that there is a high prevalence of both underweight and overweight in black children in rural South Africa, measured according to body mass index cut-offs defined by the Centres for Disease Control.
Lastly, this News Brief gives a snapshot of the new items included in the European Guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention in clinical practice.
We hope you are enjoying reading this News Brief.
Sincerely,
Professor Kathryn A. Taubert
Chief Science Officer, World Heart Federation

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

13.2 billion years


Hubble Telescope Reveals Farthermost View into the Universe

The "time tunnel into the distant past" gives us a glimpse of galaxies as they looked up to 13.2 billion years ago

TechMediaNetwork
LOOKING BACK: Called the eXtreme Deep Field, or XDF, the photo was assembled by combining 10 years of NASA Hubble Space Telescope photographs taken of a patch of sky at the center of the original Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The XDF is a small fraction of sky area, but provides a "core sample" of the heavens over 13 billion light-years.Image: NASA, ESA, G. Illingworth, D. Magee, and P. Oesch (University of California, Santa Cruz), R. Bouwens (Leiden University), and the HUDF09 Team
The Hubble Space Telescope has captured the farthest-ever view into the universe, a photo that reveals thousands of galaxies billions of light-years away.
The picture, called eXtreme Deep Field, or XDF, combines 10 years of Hubble telescope views of one patch of sky. Only the accumulated light gathered over so many observation sessions can reveal such distant objects, some of which are one ten-billionth the brightness that the human eye can see.
The photo is a sequel to the original "Hubble Ultra Deep Field," a picture the Hubble Space Telescope took in 2003 and 2004 that collected light over many hours to reveal thousands of distant galaxies in what was the deepest view of the universe so far. The XDF goes even farther, peering back 13.2 billion years into the universe's past. The universe is thought to be about 13.7 billion years old./.../

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

L. E Robinson Achutti: co-autor

Diálogo / Fotografia
Editora: Senac São Paulo
Categoria: Artes / Fotografia
Em um mundo cada vez mais marcado pela pre¬sença de câmeras digitais, muitas vezes acopladas a celulares e tablets, discutir a fotografia como uma atividade especializada, pertencente ao mundo das artes, pode parecer, para muitos, fora de contexto... [LEIA+]

Atualmente, todos nós podemos tirar uma fotogra¬fia, editá-la e, depois, compartilhá-la e exibi-la em álbuns, porta-retratos e redes sociais, como uma forma de tomar nota da vida cotidiana ou de guardar lembranças.
Em "Diálogo/fotografia", Marcia Tiburi e Luiz Eduardo Achutti retomam, por meio da prática pedagógica fundamental – o diálogo –, questões de grande importância para aqueles que se põem a pensar sobre a fotografia (sobre a sua história, o seu desenvolvimento e o seu papel): Há reconciliação possível entre a fotografia e a arte? Ou não há necessidade de reconciliação uma vez que nunca houve cisão? A fotografia é, então, uma forma de arte? Ou é toda arte uma forma de fotografia? 
Questões tão sérias quanto provocativas são discutidas de maneira leve e prazerosa. Não se trata de um livro de teoria, mas de uma correspondência entre dois amigos intelectuais que, ao explicarem seu pensamento um para o outro, nos ensinam e nos convidam para o diálogo./.../

Neighborhoods...


Physical And Mental Health Boosted By Move To Less Impoverished Neighborhoods

Main Category: Psychology / Psychiatry
Also Included In: Mental Health;  Public Health
Article Date: 24 Sep 2012 - 1:00 PDT
Moving from a high-poverty to lower-poverty neighborhood spurs long-term gains in the physical and mental health of low-income adults, as well as a substantial increase in their happiness, despite not improving economic self-sufficiency, according to a new study published in Science by researchers at the University of Chicago and partners at other institutions. 

Although moving into less disadvantaged neighborhoods did not raise incomes for the families that moved, these families experienced important gains in well-being in other ways. Moving from a high-poverty neighborhood to one with a poverty rate 13 percentage points lower increased the happiness of low-income adults by an amount equivalent to the gains caused by a $13,000 rise in family income. /.../