Sunday, April 27, 2014

Friendship

Love Undetectable: Andrew Sullivan on Why Friendship Is a Greater Gift Than Romantic Love

by 
Reflections on the cornerstone of our flourishing.
“A principal fruit of friendship,” Francis Bacon observed“is the ease and discharge of the fulness and swellings of the heart, which passions of all kinds do cause and induce.” Thoreau would“sometimes awake in the night and think of friendship and its possibilities.” St. Augustine described friendship as “sweet beyond the sweetness of life.” But what exactly is friendship — what defines its singular hallmark? Shortly after his dear friend Patrick’s death, Andrew Sullivan — one of the deepest thinkers and most enchanting writers of our time — was gripped with grief so all-consuming that it led him to examine the nature of friendship itself, a bond so special that its forceful breakage could induce pain of such unbearable proportions. In the altogether fantastic 1998 volume Love Undetectable: Notes on Friendship, Sex, and Survival (public library), he considers the inner workings of friendship and argues that its gift is far greater than that of romantic love, despite our cultural bias for the latter.
Sullivan writes:
For me, friendship has always been the most accessible of relationships — certainly far more so than romantic love. Friendship, I learned, provided a buffer in the interplay of emotions, a distance that made the risk of intimacy bearable, a space that allowed the other person to remain safely another person./.../

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