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Sunday, March 27, 2016

Memory

Neurons involved in working memory fire in bursts, not continuously
March 21, 2016

Pictured is an artist’s interpretation of neurons firing in sporadic, coordinated bursts. “By having these different bursts coming at different moments in time, you can keep different items in memory separate from one another,” Earl Miller says. (credit: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT)
How we are able to keep several things simultaneously in working memory
Think of a sentence you just read. Like that one. You’re now using your working memory, a critical brain system that’s roughly analogous to RAM memory in a computer. Neuroscientists have believed that as information is held in working memory, brain cells associated with that information must be firing continuously. Not so — they fire … more…

We need to forget things to make space to learn new things, scientists discover
March 21, 2016

The three routes into the hippocampus seem to be linked to different aspects of learning: forming memories (green), recalling them (yellow) and forgetting (red). (credit: John Wood) 
Mice study, if confirmed in people, might help forget traumatic experiences
While you’re reading this (and learning about this new study), your brain is actively trying to forget something. We apologize, but that’s what scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) and the University Pablo Olavide in Sevilla, Spain, found in a new study published Friday (March 18) in an open-access paper in Nature Communications. “This … more…

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